London Centre for Book Arts (LCBA) is the UK’s only open-access resource and education centre dedicated to book arts. Located in Fish Island, near Hackney Wick in east London.

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  1. April newsletter from the London Centre for Book Arts April newsletter from the London Centre for Book Arts
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  2. A book we picked up at Paper/view in Brussels. The first catalogue of editions and multiples by Matt Mullican published by Berlin-based Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite. A book we picked up at Paper/view in Brussels. The first catalogue of editions and multiples by Matt Mullican published by Berlin-based Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.
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    A book we picked up at Paper/view in Brussels. The first catalogue of editions and multiples by Matt Mullican published by Berlin-based Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.

  3. Back in stock!Bookbinding Tool Kit from the London Centre for Book Arts. The perfect kit for beginner bookbinders and craft makers. All tools are carefully selected and sourced in the UK. Kit contains: Awl, bone folder, clip-point shoe knife, paste brush, needles & linen thread. To order and to find out more, please visit our online shop Back in stock!Bookbinding Tool Kit from the London Centre for Book Arts. The perfect kit for beginner bookbinders and craft makers. All tools are carefully selected and sourced in the UK. Kit contains: Awl, bone folder, clip-point shoe knife, paste brush, needles & linen thread. To order and to find out more, please visit our online shop
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    Back in stock!

    Bookbinding Tool Kit from the London Centre for Book Arts. The perfect kit for beginner bookbinders and craft makers. All tools are carefully selected and sourced in the UK.

    Kit contains: Awl, bone folder, clip-point shoe knife, paste brush, needles & linen thread.

    To order and to find out more, please visit our online shop

  4. New workshops just added to our calendar; including another session of Letterpress Nights held one night/week for 4 weeks in May, and Sewing Variations, a new workshop exploring different sewing styles in bookbinding. Take a look New workshops just added to our calendar; including another session of Letterpress Nights held one night/week for 4 weeks in May, and Sewing Variations, a new workshop exploring different sewing styles in bookbinding. Take a look
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    New workshops just added to our calendar; including another session of Letterpress Nights held one night/week for 4 weeks in May, and Sewing Variations, a new workshop exploring different sewing styles in bookbinding. Take a look

  5. The exhibition Please Come To The Show at the Exhibition Research Centre in Liverpool is on view until 11 April 2014.
(If you can’t make it, Please Come to the Show also has a fantastic online archive of ephemera from the MoMA Library here)

via ERC
Please Come to the Show Initiated and curated by David Senior Designed by John Webster
Opening Thursday 13 February 2014, 6–8pm
Exhibition 14 February–11 April 2014

Since its beginnings, the MoMA Library has housed several collections of artists’ files and subject files, which contain assorted printed ephemera like announcement cards, press clippings, posters, and flyers. These materials illustrate an elaborate range of artistic activities and can contain unique elements from an artist’ s practice.
This exhibition gathers a sample of innovative printed invitations, small posters, and flyers from ca. 1960 to the present from the MoMA Library collection. The selection traces ways in which artists, designers, and galleries have used invitation cards and other printed announcements as a part of the staging of conceptual works, installations, performances, and other time-based events and screenings. This diverse grouping of ephemera explores the various, often surprising ways that we have been invited to experience art.
These materials are important research documents. They provide descriptive evidence of particular moments in art history, evoking the setting and spirit of artists’ practices and illuminating networks of artists, spaces, and ideas. The invitations reflect, disguise, or reconstitute artworks and can act as mechanisms that direct the audience’s experience of the work, and some are also artworks themselves. They give clues about librarians’ and curators’ involvement with particular artists or scenes in New York and abroad, and part of their story is the various traces of the hands they have passed through on their way into the collection.
More recent materials characterize the persistence of innovative print invitations within the context of our shift to online communication. Part of the interest in doing an exhibition now of special invitations and flyers is related to the recognition that this phenomenon of the art invitation has changed. As libraries and archives actively work towards collecting digital content and as galleries and museums phase out their printed invitations, it is a fitting moment to reflect on the various forms the printed invitation has taken in contemporary art practices.
David Senior is the Bibliographer at The Museum of Modern Art Library, where he manages collection development, including the library’s artists’ books collection. He also curates exhibitions – most recently ‘Millenium Magazines’ (2012), ‘Access to Tools: Publications from the Whole Earth Catalog, 1968–74′ (2011) and ‘Scenes from Zagreb: Artists’ Publications of the New Art Practice’ (2011) – and the annual pro­gram of events for the New York and Los Angeles Art Book Fairs. His writing has appeared in Frieze, Bulletins of the Serving Library, A Prior, Art Papers and C Magazine, and since 2008 he has published an artist’s book series through the New York Art Book Fair, with titles by Dexter Sinister, David Horvitz, Emily Roysdon and Eve Fowler, among others. He is a member of the advisory boards of Printed Matter, Art Metropole, Primary Information, Yale Union, and the Serving Library.
The exhibition Please Come To The Show at the Exhibition Research Centre in Liverpool is on view until 11 April 2014.
(If you can’t make it, Please Come to the Show also has a fantastic online archive of ephemera from the MoMA Library here)

via ERC
Please Come to the Show Initiated and curated by David Senior Designed by John Webster
Opening Thursday 13 February 2014, 6–8pm
Exhibition 14 February–11 April 2014

Since its beginnings, the MoMA Library has housed several collections of artists’ files and subject files, which contain assorted printed ephemera like announcement cards, press clippings, posters, and flyers. These materials illustrate an elaborate range of artistic activities and can contain unique elements from an artist’ s practice.
This exhibition gathers a sample of innovative printed invitations, small posters, and flyers from ca. 1960 to the present from the MoMA Library collection. The selection traces ways in which artists, designers, and galleries have used invitation cards and other printed announcements as a part of the staging of conceptual works, installations, performances, and other time-based events and screenings. This diverse grouping of ephemera explores the various, often surprising ways that we have been invited to experience art.
These materials are important research documents. They provide descriptive evidence of particular moments in art history, evoking the setting and spirit of artists’ practices and illuminating networks of artists, spaces, and ideas. The invitations reflect, disguise, or reconstitute artworks and can act as mechanisms that direct the audience’s experience of the work, and some are also artworks themselves. They give clues about librarians’ and curators’ involvement with particular artists or scenes in New York and abroad, and part of their story is the various traces of the hands they have passed through on their way into the collection.
More recent materials characterize the persistence of innovative print invitations within the context of our shift to online communication. Part of the interest in doing an exhibition now of special invitations and flyers is related to the recognition that this phenomenon of the art invitation has changed. As libraries and archives actively work towards collecting digital content and as galleries and museums phase out their printed invitations, it is a fitting moment to reflect on the various forms the printed invitation has taken in contemporary art practices.
David Senior is the Bibliographer at The Museum of Modern Art Library, where he manages collection development, including the library’s artists’ books collection. He also curates exhibitions – most recently ‘Millenium Magazines’ (2012), ‘Access to Tools: Publications from the Whole Earth Catalog, 1968–74′ (2011) and ‘Scenes from Zagreb: Artists’ Publications of the New Art Practice’ (2011) – and the annual pro­gram of events for the New York and Los Angeles Art Book Fairs. His writing has appeared in Frieze, Bulletins of the Serving Library, A Prior, Art Papers and C Magazine, and since 2008 he has published an artist’s book series through the New York Art Book Fair, with titles by Dexter Sinister, David Horvitz, Emily Roysdon and Eve Fowler, among others. He is a member of the advisory boards of Printed Matter, Art Metropole, Primary Information, Yale Union, and the Serving Library.
    High Resolution

    The exhibition Please Come To The Show at the Exhibition Research Centre in Liverpool is on view until 11 April 2014.

    (If you can’t make it, Please Come to the Show also has a fantastic online archive of ephemera from the MoMA Library here)

    via ERC

    Please Come to the Show
    Initiated and curated by David Senior
    Designed by John Webster

    Opening
    Thursday 13 February 2014, 6–8pm

    Exhibition
    14 February–11 April 2014

    Since its beginnings, the MoMA Library has housed several collections of artists’ files and subject files, which contain assorted printed ephemera like announcement cards, press clippings, posters, and flyers. These materials illustrate an elaborate range of artistic activities and can contain unique elements from an artist’ s practice.

    This exhibition gathers a sample of innovative printed invitations, small posters, and flyers from ca. 1960 to the present from the MoMA Library collection. The selection traces ways in which artists, designers, and galleries have used invitation cards and other printed announcements as a part of the staging of conceptual works, installations, performances, and other time-based events and screenings. This diverse grouping of ephemera explores the various, often surprising ways that we have been invited to experience art.

    These materials are important research documents. They provide descriptive evidence of particular moments in art history, evoking the setting and spirit of artists’ practices and illuminating networks of artists, spaces, and ideas. The invitations reflect, disguise, or reconstitute artworks and can act as mechanisms that direct the audience’s experience of the work, and some are also artworks themselves. They give clues about librarians’ and curators’ involvement with particular artists or scenes in New York and abroad, and part of their story is the various traces of the hands they have passed through on their way into the collection.

    More recent materials characterize the persistence of innovative print invitations within the context of our shift to online communication. Part of the interest in doing an exhibition now of special invitations and flyers is related to the recognition that this phenomenon of the art invitation has changed. As libraries and archives actively work towards collecting digital content and as galleries and museums phase out their printed invitations, it is a fitting moment to reflect on the various forms the printed invitation has taken in contemporary art practices.

    David Senior is the Bibliographer at The Museum of Modern Art Library, where he manages collection development, including the library’s artists’ books collection. He also curates exhibitions – most recently ‘Millenium Magazines’ (2012), ‘Access to Tools: Publications from the Whole Earth Catalog, 1968–74′ (2011) and ‘Scenes from Zagreb: Artists’ Publications of the New Art Practice’ (2011) – and the annual pro­gram of events for the New York and Los Angeles Art Book Fairs. His writing has appeared in FriezeBulletins of the Serving LibraryA PriorArt Papers and C Magazine, and since 2008 he has published an artist’s book series through the New York Art Book Fair, with titles by Dexter Sinister, David Horvitz, Emily Roysdon and Eve Fowler, among others. He is a member of the advisory boards of Printed Matter, Art Metropole, Primary Information, Yale Union, and the Serving Library.

  6. Three Star Books is a Paris-based producer of artist books and editions. They work closely with artists to produce finely crafted ‘books’ in the loosest sense of the term. A firmly contemporary take on the tradition of the Parisian livre d’artiste.
via imgltd Three Star Books is a Paris-based producer of artist books and editions. They work closely with artists to produce finely crafted ‘books’ in the loosest sense of the term. A firmly contemporary take on the tradition of the Parisian livre d’artiste.
via imgltd
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    Three Star Books is a Paris-based producer of artist books and editions. They work closely with artists to produce finely crafted ‘books’ in the loosest sense of the term. A firmly contemporary take on the tradition of the Parisian livre d’artiste.

    via imgltd

  7. A few new books available from our online shop including the second edition of Self-Reliance Library by Temporary Services A few new books available from our online shop including the second edition of Self-Reliance Library by Temporary Services
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    A few new books available from our online shop including the second edition of Self-Reliance Library by Temporary Services

  8. A wonderful exhibition of early works by Stephen Willats, including early issues of Control (pictured above) currently on view at Raven Row
via Raven Row

Control. Stephen Willats. Work 1962–6923 January to 30 March 2014

This is the first survey of work by Stephen Willats from the sixties. Willats (born and lives in London) was introduced to art as a teenage gallery assistant in 1958 and by 1962 was producing advanced artwork. He embraced the transdiscipli­n­arity of the time, juggling the roles of social scientist, engineer, designer and artist, and developed an art about social interaction, using models derived from cybernetics, the hybrid post-war science of communication.
As well as the clothing and furniture made in 1965 when he briefly described himself as a ‘conceptual designer’, Willats’ earliest sculptural series of ‘Manual Variables’ is haptic and interactive. These will be shown alongside early issues of Control, the still-operating magazine he founded in the same period. Its title is a provocation, invoking the cybernetic idea that people can take control of their environments, thereby deflecting the controls of a dominant hierarchy.
In 1968 Willats made an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in which he presented constructions involving movement and light – some wall-mounted, others large-scale environments – that were informed by his interest in contemporary theories: about probability and prediction, behavioural science, subliminal advertising, and colour in relation to motivation and learning. The display of these at Raven Row will be based on the darkened maze in which they were installed at Oxford, where they were proposed as experimental stimuli for ‘states of consciousness’.
Willats’ works on paper from this period elegantly combine cybernetic modelling, architectural graphics and constructivist geometries, and are consistent with his practice of today. However, he abandoned his dynamic constructions at the end of the sixties in pursuit of an art of social interaction beyond gallery and art object, for which he became well-known. This exhibition reconvenes this earlier work for the first time.
The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated publication, with texts by Antony Hudek, Emily Pethick, Christabel Stewart and Andrew Wilson. It is curated by Alex Sainsbury.

A wonderful exhibition of early works by Stephen Willats, including early issues of Control (pictured above) currently on view at Raven Row
via Raven Row

Control. Stephen Willats. Work 1962–6923 January to 30 March 2014

This is the first survey of work by Stephen Willats from the sixties. Willats (born and lives in London) was introduced to art as a teenage gallery assistant in 1958 and by 1962 was producing advanced artwork. He embraced the transdiscipli­n­arity of the time, juggling the roles of social scientist, engineer, designer and artist, and developed an art about social interaction, using models derived from cybernetics, the hybrid post-war science of communication.
As well as the clothing and furniture made in 1965 when he briefly described himself as a ‘conceptual designer’, Willats’ earliest sculptural series of ‘Manual Variables’ is haptic and interactive. These will be shown alongside early issues of Control, the still-operating magazine he founded in the same period. Its title is a provocation, invoking the cybernetic idea that people can take control of their environments, thereby deflecting the controls of a dominant hierarchy.
In 1968 Willats made an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in which he presented constructions involving movement and light – some wall-mounted, others large-scale environments – that were informed by his interest in contemporary theories: about probability and prediction, behavioural science, subliminal advertising, and colour in relation to motivation and learning. The display of these at Raven Row will be based on the darkened maze in which they were installed at Oxford, where they were proposed as experimental stimuli for ‘states of consciousness’.
Willats’ works on paper from this period elegantly combine cybernetic modelling, architectural graphics and constructivist geometries, and are consistent with his practice of today. However, he abandoned his dynamic constructions at the end of the sixties in pursuit of an art of social interaction beyond gallery and art object, for which he became well-known. This exhibition reconvenes this earlier work for the first time.
The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated publication, with texts by Antony Hudek, Emily Pethick, Christabel Stewart and Andrew Wilson. It is curated by Alex Sainsbury.
    High Resolution

    A wonderful exhibition of early works by Stephen Willats, including early issues of Control (pictured above) currently on view at Raven Row

    via Raven Row

    This is the first survey of work by Stephen Willats from the sixties. Willats (born and lives in London) was introduced to art as a teenage gallery assistant in 1958 and by 1962 was producing advanced artwork. He embraced the transdiscipli­n­arity of the time, juggling the roles of social scientist, engineer, designer and artist, and developed an art about social interaction, using models derived from cybernetics, the hybrid post-war science of communication.

    As well as the clothing and furniture made in 1965 when he briefly described himself as a ‘conceptual designer’, Willats’ earliest sculptural series of ‘Manual Variables’ is haptic and interactive. These will be shown alongside early issues of Control, the still-operating magazine he founded in the same period. Its title is a provocation, invoking the cybernetic idea that people can take control of their environments, thereby deflecting the controls of a dominant hierarchy.

    In 1968 Willats made an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in which he presented constructions involving movement and light – some wall-mounted, others large-scale environments – that were informed by his interest in contemporary theories: about probability and prediction, behavioural science, subliminal advertising, and colour in relation to motivation and learning. The display of these at Raven Row will be based on the darkened maze in which they were installed at Oxford, where they were proposed as experimental stimuli for ‘states of consciousness’.

    Willats’ works on paper from this period elegantly combine cybernetic modelling, architectural graphics and constructivist geometries, and are consistent with his practice of today. However, he abandoned his dynamic constructions at the end of the sixties in pursuit of an art of social interaction beyond gallery and art object, for which he became well-known. This exhibition reconvenes this earlier work for the first time.

    The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated publication, with texts by Antony Hudek, Emily Pethick, Christabel Stewart and Andrew Wilson. It is curated by Alex Sainsbury.

  9. Tonight! Occasional Papers launches a facsimile reprint of Robert Fillou’s Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts at the Whitechapel Gallery.
via Occasional Papers
Please join us at the launch of our facsimile edition of artist Robert Filliou’s essential primer Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts, first published in 1970. We’ll be screening some of Filliou’s video works, followed by a discussion with artist Richard Demarco and Antony Hudek.
Thursday 13 March, 7pm Whitechapel Gallery Tickets £8.50 / £6.50 Book online at www.whitechapel.org Tonight! Occasional Papers launches a facsimile reprint of Robert Fillou’s Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts at the Whitechapel Gallery.
via Occasional Papers
Please join us at the launch of our facsimile edition of artist Robert Filliou’s essential primer Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts, first published in 1970. We’ll be screening some of Filliou’s video works, followed by a discussion with artist Richard Demarco and Antony Hudek.
Thursday 13 March, 7pm Whitechapel Gallery Tickets £8.50 / £6.50 Book online at www.whitechapel.org
    High Resolution

    Tonight! Occasional Papers launches a facsimile reprint of Robert Fillou’s Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts at the Whitechapel Gallery.

    via Occasional Papers

    Please join us at the launch of our facsimile edition of artist Robert Filliou’s essential primer Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts, first published in 1970. We’ll be screening some of Filliou’s video works, followed by a discussion with artist Richard Demarco and Antony Hudek.

    Thursday 13 March, 7pm
    Whitechapel Gallery
    Tickets £8.50 / £6.50
    Book online at www.whitechapel.org

  10. Fish Island via @londonbookarts on Instagram Fish Island via @londonbookarts on Instagram
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